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Residential

houses, dorms, apartments, boarding houses

McClintic-Marshall House

Architect: Frederick Larson
Patrons: Lehigh Alumni Association
Dates: 1955-1956, Dedicated 1957
Type: Residential
Nickname: M&M
In Honor of Lehigh Alumni Howard Hale McClintic and Charles Donnell Marshall

Construction

By 1966 the City of Bethlehem acquired the last of the homes in the Lost Neighborhood through purchase and eminent domain. By 1967, the demolition of the homes in the Lost Neighborhood was complete and construction began.

Dravo Hall

Freshman residence hall that held the Dravo Experiment. Also known as the segregation plan, the Dravo Experiment was a pilot program that would study the complete separation of upperclassmen from freshmen for one year. The success of the experiment led to the formation of the Gryphon Society.

Butler Street

In 1965, Butler Street became part of the Packer Avenue Urban Renewal Project. The project demolished homes, schools, and businesses to allow for the expansion of the Lehigh University Campus. The Lost Neighborhood tour seeks to document locations lost to the Packer Avenue Urban Renewal Project.

Webster Street

He had almost made up his mind that he was going to live in a house over on the west side of Bethlehem… but then he got smart and he said, “All the people that are going to elect me live over here, so I’m going to build my house on Webster Street.”

Packer Avenue

The only day I ever skipped school in my life was in October 1967. The Red Sox were playing the St. Louis Cardinals. Me and my buddy… we didn’t plan it too well. We didn’t have a place to go watch the game. So we came up to the Student Union building at Lehigh and we got caught!

New Street

"They would close New Street in wintertime for sledding between Packer and Morton, so you really just had to walk out your door, and your friends would be there." - Mrs. Pat Girke, former resident.

Morton Street

"The neighborhood kids would collect bottles and return them for the deposit. It was only two cents, but that was two cents of candy...it was a neat place..." - Mr. James Ruhf , former resident.

Adams Street

In his backyard he [Henry Kelly] had chicken coops and homing pigeons… when the family would come back to visit with them, what he would do is take one of the homing pigeons and put it in a cardboard box and let them take it home with them.

Demolition

"This wasn't just a bunch of historic buildings...this was a neighborhood, where people lived and cared about each other." -Mary Pongracz

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